Marketable skills — Totseans

Marketable skills

MegaKushMegaKush Regular
edited August 2011 in Life
Its good to have multiple sources of income. Skills which people need, that can earn you money. Some good examples are locksmithing, electricial work, and promotion.

It is useful to have marketable skills that you can fall back on, perhaps even thrive on if you are determined.

The norm is working for a company/govt/whatever where you get income from one source, set amount pay for set amount of work. While this is good for stability, it gets boring. It doesn't leave you with much freedom. I know this is the only way to live for most, but there are alternatives to this.

I landscape. It's been hard to find work for me, but thats my own fault. I need to get off my ass and start offering my services.

Do any of yall work for yourself?

Comments

  • buddhabuddha Regular
    edited July 2011
    Yes, do mostly landscaping type stuff also, but I'll pull weeds if I have too. There is always someone looking for help, if you can't find work it's your own damn fault, get off the couch you lazy bitch.
  • ChupaloChupalo Regular
    edited July 2011
    Go read "Skip College" by J.J. Luna.

    It will answer all of your questions.
  • LethargicaLethargica Regular
    edited July 2011
    business skills and life skills is what we need in the 21st century
  • edited July 2011
    Lethargica wrote: »
    business skills and life skills is what we need in the 21st century

    QUOTE FOR MOTHERFUCKING TRUTH.

    Life skills is the key here. So many dickheads have no idea about how to function as an effective adult - I managed to get employed at the same level as degree graduates while i was still a student because i can talk the talk.
  • RogueEagle91RogueEagle91 Regular
    edited July 2011
    I more or less work for myself.
    I've had 2-3 jobs at a time since I was 14 or so.
    You go in and learn everything you can.
    When you there's nothing left or no room to move up, leave and apply the skills elsewhere.
    Sadly, business isn't that great at the moment.
    Market isn't spectacular in Omaha for guitar techs/luthiers with less than 20yrs experience.
    14 more to go, I suppose.
  • LethargicaLethargica Regular
    edited July 2011
    I more or less work for myself.
    I've had 2-3 jobs at a time since I was 14 or so.
    You go in and learn everything you can.
    When you there's nothing left or no room to move up, leave and apply the skills elsewhere.
    Sadly, business isn't that great at the moment.
    Market isn't spectacular in Omaha for guitar techs/luthiers with less than 20yrs experience.
    14 more to go, I suppose.

    The best type of businesses are the ones where you do not need any experience in prior to starting

    This is a life lesson here RogueEagle, people need to learn how to adapt to their environment. You need to change something, go into another industry other than music and try to move from there.

    changing jobs means that all your work trying to make it to the top of the corporate pyramid has been lost, and you need to start at the bottom of another corporate pyramid. There are many times where you cannot use your the skills you learned from your job...outside of your job.

    but in the end it is all up to you and i wish you good luck
  • MegaKushMegaKush Regular
    edited July 2011
    Yes, social skills are also very important in working for yourself. You have to convince people to want your goods or services.
  • LethargicaLethargica Regular
    edited July 2011
    Social skills are indeed important but many people conceptualize that you need to "convince" people to buy products/services. Ironically, those people are the ones that do terrible in business.
  • RogueEagle91RogueEagle91 Regular
    edited July 2011
    Not all the jobs i've had were in music.
    I've adapted as I can, but there are always limits to how far that will take you.
    It's looking hopeful that I'll be staying in the industry, just under someone else's corporate umbrella.
    No biggie. Work is work, and I'm sure I'll learn quite a bit.
    The nice thing throughout the years has been even if I start at the bottom of the proverbial pyramid, it doesn't take me long to rise up again.
    Last two "regular" jobs I had, I was promoted to management within 3-6 months.

    It's less a matter of being able to directly transfer skills so much as knowing how to alter them to your own benefit.
    Sometimes it's just a matter of broadening your concept of the skills you have.
    Some call what I do as purely guitar repair.
    In reality, it's a lot of problem solving, geometry, electrical/circuitry experience, carpentry, painting, and metalwork.
    Without it, I wouldn't know dick about car electronics or the mechanical workings of cars.
    I wouldn't know how to rewire my house or in many cases, the places i've worked.
    I wouldn't have the furniture I have, and many employers would have spent unnecessary amounts of money on new pieces.
    That and more is just what I've picked up from one job in my life.

    Career progression often comes down to your ability to learn quickly and apply the culmination of your skills to your job, whether it's an obvious fit or not.
    That said, I've always survived due to everything i've picked up and will continue to through the foreseeable future.

    I will agree that businesses with no required experience are successful.
    This is simply where life has driven me. And I'm ok with that.
  • MegaKushMegaKush Regular
    edited July 2011
    Lethargica wrote: »
    Social skills are indeed important but many people conceptualize that you need to "convince" people to buy products/services. Ironically, those people are the ones that do terrible in business.

    lol ive worked for some shitty companies/people

    Inspiring posts tho. .
  • UsernameUsername Acolyte
    edited August 2011
    My mother had me building furniture and cooking at the age or six or seven until I started working on the farm at twelve. When I turned sixteen I got my first real job as a server. I completely enjoyed it! I've only severed for three to four years but I've decided to use all of my past job exp to start up a bed and breakfast. My husband and I are still looking at location but we hope to open in a year.

    Some jobs I've done on the side

    1. Teaching ppl to cook.
    2. Cleaning houses.
    3. Sewing/patching clothes
    4. Building furniture.
    5. Remodeling/painting.
    6. Making and selling trinkets/toys.
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited August 2011
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