If opiods inhibit REM sleep, then what explains a nod dream? — Totseans

If opiods inhibit REM sleep, then what explains a nod dream?

ImaginariumImaginarium Regular
edited July 2010 in Man Cave
Anyone have a decent explanation, speculation, or bullshit they pulled out of their ass to explain this? Apparently opiods inhibit REM sleep, so I suppose that might mean that a nod dream is something much outside the realm of normal dreaming.

Comments

  • HydroponochronicHydroponochronic Semo-Regulars
    edited July 2010
    I would guess that a good opiate nod dream would be a result of sensory deprivation (in combo with intense euphoria) rather than a traditional dream state. IE, the numbness and contentedness result in your mind losing track of your body/senses, and just creating it's own sensory input.
  • HydroponochronicHydroponochronic Semo-Regulars
    edited July 2010
    Also, shit, rizzo, is it really you? Why haven't you gone back to &z? Are you that scared of someone?
  • ImaginariumImaginarium Regular
    edited July 2010
    I was under the impression that during normal sleep you first undergo a similar sort of sensory deprivation, and then later entered into a REM dream sleep. I guess I'm being a bit silly expecting any kind of answer considering how little we really know about dreaming, but it's still something interesting to mull over.
    Also, shit, rizzo, is it really you? Why haven't you gone back to &z? Are you that scared of someone?

    No, I retired my RiaB account because I was scared of the police and going to prison, was homeless for a good month and just recently started posting on forums again. The other day I logged into my alt account on &Z through a proxeh and soon afterwards mike banned me. That plus all the retarded bullshit drama that's going on over there...well, let's just say I'm not even going to bother posting a "goodbye late im going to &ti" but you will find me here.
  • HydroponochronicHydroponochronic Semo-Regulars
    edited July 2010
    I was under the impression that during normal sleep you first undergo a similar sort of sensory deprivation, and then later entered into a REM dream sleep.
    It's possible that the REM sleep simply coincides with a dream state. I don't yet have a complete theory of dreaming, but I am fairly sure it is not an intentional product of sleep.

    I'm replying to the rest of your post in TRsT, since I don't want this thread to get spammd.
  • edited July 2010
    Maybe not all opiates inhibit REM sleep, or maybe they effect different peoples dreams in different ways.

    Maybe opiates allow dreams without REM sleep somehow?

    Just speculating here, I don't know shit about mu receptors.
  • HydroponochronicHydroponochronic Semo-Regulars
    edited July 2010
    Maybe not all opiates inhibit REM sleep, or maybe they effect different peoples dreams in different ways.

    Maybe opiates allow dreams without REM sleep somehow?
    I don't believe rem sleep is necessary for dreaming, but rather a coincidence.
    Just speculating here, I don't know shit about mu receptors.
    Few people do. Speculation can be quite helpful at times.

    :)
  • L33tzL33tz Regular
    edited July 2010
    Inhibition of REM sleep is followed by a rebound increase in REM sleep associated with cardiopulmonary complications.
  • FrYFrY Regular
    edited July 2010
    Thats odd, when I am useing opiates for months I have dreams. Infact very very lucid ones.

    Weed on the otherhand keeps me dreaming when I am awake.
  • 0omnidirectional0omnidirectional New Arrival
    edited July 2010
    The REM period is not the only time that dreaming occurs.
  • HeaTHeaT New Arrival
    edited July 2010
    I'm pretty sure dreams can only occur during REM sleep, actually, but there's quite a simple explanation. It actually has more to do with the English language than science. "inhibits" is not synonymous with "prevents.

    Though, I do have some craazy dreams on opiates, sometimes. Sadly, through my opiate addiction, I've developed sleep apnea. That's one of the big reasons you always wake up EXHAUSTED and sleep through the entire day
  • FrYFrY Regular
    edited July 2010
    HeaT wrote: »
    I'm pretty sure dreams can only occur during REM sleep, actually, but there's quite a simple explanation. It actually has more to do with the English language than science. "inhibits" is not synonymous with "prevents.

    Though, I do have some craazy dreams on opiates, sometimes. Sadly, through my opiate addiction, I've developed sleep apnea. That's one of the big reasons you always wake up EXHAUSTED and sleep through the entire day

    How the fuck did you develop sleep apnea from opiates?
  • edited July 2010
    FrY wrote: »
    How the fuck did you develop sleep apnea from opiates?

    Maybe he's a fat son of a bitch.

    EDIT: I did some googling and apparently there are different types of sleep-apnea caused by various things. Central Sleep Apnea is caused when the signals from the respiratory parts of the CNS are dampened or cut off. For some, even sleeping is enough to cause the brain to give poor signals to the lungs (Resulting in slower or disturbed breathing). Drugs like Opiates can cause Central Sleep Apnea (Basically respiratory arrest) due to their depressant properties.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_sleep_apnea

    And I always thought that Apnea was applied only to people who's throats would become obstructed for some reason (called Obstructive Sleep Apnea).
  • ObscuraObscura Semo-Regulars
    edited July 2010
    My guess is that it's related to the fact that a lot of opioids are also slight kappa opioid receptor agonist. When you're nodding you're probably not even in deep enough sleep for REM I assume.
  • 0omnidirectional0omnidirectional New Arrival
    edited July 2010
    Obscura wrote: »
    My guess is that it's related to the fact that a lot of opioids are also slight kappa opioid receptor agonist. When you're nodding you're probably not even in deep enough sleep for REM I assume.


    Brain activity when in REM sleep is almost as high as when you're awake, just in different areas.
    I'm pretty sure dreams can only occur during REM sleep

    Well, you're wrong. It is a different kind of dreaming when all those chemicals are released and your brain activity suddenly increases, but that is not the only time when sleeping that would be considered dreaming.
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