Growing Herbs and Spices. — Totseans

Growing Herbs and Spices.

DaktologistDaktologist Global Moderator
edited November 2011 in Life
So this summer I am thinking about growing my own herbs and spices for culinary uses. I know how to grow most culinary herbs, however when it comes to spices I haven't really tried growing them before. Mainly I would like to make things like curries and other spicy foods with home grown herbs and spices. If you have any ideas, they would be appreciated.

Comments

  • BurnBurn Regular
    edited September 2011
    Mint is probably the easiest herb to grow, as it can get out of control easily. This can obviously be both a blessing and a curse. Parsely, chillies, thyme and rosemary are all simple to grow, at least in an Australian climate.
  • HOLLISTER GUYHOLLISTER GUY Regular
    edited September 2011
    Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme

    I've never heard of anybody growing cumin, coriander, fenugreek, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, or fennel in a garden, but i suppose it could be possible in the right climate if you really wanted to grow your own curry.
  • BurnBurn Regular
    edited October 2011
    Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme

    I've never heard of anybody growing cumin, coriander, fenugreek, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, or fennel in a garden, but i suppose it could be possible in the right climate if you really wanted to grow your own curry.

    I've got coriander, and have failed at fennel. I much prefer to grow fruit now though, but my backyard is fucking tiny, so all my fruit trees are in pots:(
  • DaktologistDaktologist Global Moderator
    edited October 2011

    I've never heard of anybody growing cumin, coriander, fenugreek, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, or fennel in a garden, but i suppose it could be possible in the right climate if you really wanted to grow your own curry.

    I suppose it would grow in a glasshouse or indoors but im not sure.
  • dr rockerdr rocker Regular
    edited October 2011
    Nah, its a lattitude thing man. Most things that are particular to Indian type curries and most other curries do well in the tropics. Its not a heat thing but down to the number of hours of consistant daylight available over a longer growing season normally. If you want to grow some ingredient for a curry to a high standard, grow your own garlic, shallots, onions and tomatoes. You will be able to get some brilliant crops of these if you put some time and effort into it. You could also grow some fenungreek, a lot of places sell the seeds as agreen manure.

    For spices, find a decent place where Asians but their spices, and learn what good spice is. In the UK we are begining to see a lot of Asian allotment holders, some of them children of older allotment holders. I have spoken to quite a few asking them how they came about such an "English" pastime - the answer is always the same - anyone who can get a bit of land is a gardener back at the old country.

    Never seen any of them produce things to become spices - if it could reliably be done I would expect some of these guys to be doing it.
  • MEATMEAT Acolyte
    edited November 2011
    Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme

    I've never heard of anybody growing cumin, coriander, fenugreek, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, or fennel in a garden, but i suppose it could be possible in the right climate if you really wanted to grow your own curry.

    Cinnamon comes from the bark of a tree if I'm not mistaken?
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited November 2011
    MEAT wrote: »
    Cinnamon comes from the bark of a tree if I'm not mistaken?

    You are correct sir.
    Cinnamon spice is made from tree bark. Two species of the cinnamon tree are most common, and provide most of the spice sold worldwide. The spice from Cinnamomum cassia has a stronger taste and dark brown colour. This version of the spice is popular in the United States. "True" cinnamon is a common term for the Cinnamomum zeylanicum, a native of Sri Lanka (Ceylon). Its spice is sweeter in flavour.
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited November 2011
    Quite a few spices can be grown here. However they need to be container grown indoors for the most part. Lemongrass, ginger, curry leaves, chillies, vanilla and saffron. Here's a useful site for instructions.

    http://www.growingedge.com/magazine/pdf/GE_1906_p46.pdf

    I've grown chillies and lemongrass in a greenhouse before, and saffron is from the crocus which can be grown in any garden.
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