Mirtazapine ??? — Totseans

Mirtazapine ???

JackedJacked Regular
edited December 2011 in Man Cave
Was at the mrs joint 2 nights ago and couldn't sleep. I asked her to get me something to help me sleep. She comes back with a tiny pill which she bites in half. I ingested half of it at 113Opm nd within 3O I was out

Wake up next day at 530am rushing to work coz I'm late I feel drowsy as fuck . Get to work and I'm struggling to stay awake, I'm zoning in and out, slurred speach really bad and would from out of nowhere get a rush of energy for 2 seconds see silver flashes then hit bottom again and feel drowsy. Had a coffee felt a little better got through the day. Got home ate sat on the couch zoning out, then went to bed because I was bored. Got into bed at 715pm. Woke up 2 times for a couple of minutes but went right back to sleep till 530am the next morning.

I'm at work now, still feel drowsy, still getting a rush of tingling sensations whenever I am slightly excited.... And time is going fucking slow!!!

Anyone know much about this drug? Iv read on wiki it's an anti depressant? Anyone taken it b4?

Comments

  • ModzillaModzilla New Arrival
    edited December 2011
    I couldn't tell you much about this drug other than what you've probably read on wikipedia. IIRC it's an SNRI.

    The difference between Mirtazapine and most anti-depressants is due to the fact it's an SNRI. Most modern ADs are Selective Serotonin Re-Uptake Inhibitors (SSRI) - which basically means they stop the "re-uptake" of serotonin in the brain, ergo increasing the levels and eliciting the therapeutic effect (over a longer period of time) of increasing the mood; atleast in theory. (Serotonin is actually responsible for way more than mood, but psychiatric meds tend to work on a pretty simple model - hence the amount of co-pharmacy in treating some disorders)

    However, Mirtazapine also works with levels of norepinephrine/noradrenaline in a similar fashion; hence classification as an SNRI.

    You probably got drowsy because it seems to hit histamine receptors too.
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