Ask a Chef Thread — Totseans

Ask a Chef Thread

jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
edited June 2012 in Life
ITT: you ask me questions about the preparation of food. Or any other questions you may have about the hospitality industry.

Any other ToTSEans who are Chefs are welcome to answer questions as well.

Bare in mind I do not know everything, but I will find an answer for you if I am not certain of the answer.

Comments

  • DfgDfg Admin
    edited November 2011
    What's the best way to cook fries and Coffee :)
  • SpinsterSpinster Regular
    edited November 2011
    whats are some easy, cheap n tasty recipes for someone who is just learning to cook?
  • (nameless one)(nameless one) Regular
    edited November 2011
    I've been meaning to cook venison. Should I go steak, stew or any recommendations?
  • SpinsterSpinster Regular
    edited November 2011
    omg venison! I just came I little
  • jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
    edited November 2011
    Dfg wrote: »
    What's the best way to cook fries
    1.Grab yourself some potatoes. I use Nicola potatoes
    2.Peel potatoes and keep in a bucket of water.
    3.Cut your Fries to a desired thickness ...i find shoestring fries have much more of a crust to core ratio and thick fries are more like roast potatoes with a fried crust
    4.If a crispy chip is the most important thing to you pre-blanch fries in 55 C water for 40 minutes. If you like the fluffy texture in a chip as much as the crust do not do this as it actually changes the potato and can cause a 'hollow fry'.
    5.Rinse off fries and blanch in salty water until they are cooked through.(and i do mean blanch ... do not boil the fuck out of your fries or they gonna break homes)
    6.Dry in you oven on a low heat (around 80 C with the fan on until the fries have a leathery outside)
    7.Next choose your oil im not going to go into what oils are better (cause that will take forever) but just get a oil that has a high burning point.
    heat your oil up to 150 C and fry your chips until they have a light crust and are very blonde (still white) and then place them on a tray (IMPORTANT: you do not want to cook the fries to golden brown yet!!)
    8.Freeze your fries... JUST DO IT...
    9.now time for the last step heat your oil to 190 C and cook your fries until golden brown, shake off excess oil and season.... and finally ENJOY them..

    this might sound like a very long process but every step is there for a reason and you WILL have awesome fries.
    Dfg wrote: »
    and Coffee :)
    chefs dont make coffee
    I get waitresses to make my coffee so i wouldnt know...
  • jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
    edited November 2011
    Spinster wrote: »
    whats are some easy, cheap n tasty recipes for someone who is just learning to cook?
    Roasts, braises, soups, Any pasta dish and curries. there are heaps of recipes on the net ... just start out with simple things like roast chicken, braised steak & onion, bolanaise etc.. and then once you get good at them slowly tackle the harder recipes

    Oh and nameless what part of the venison are you wanting to cook?
  • juggjugg Regular
    edited November 2011
    This will sound stupid but I have the biggest bitch of a time chopping an onion. Every time I do it the pieces are way to big. I have tried a few different ways but it never comes out worth a shit. Any tips or tricks would be great.
  • (nameless one)(nameless one) Regular
    edited November 2011
    Not really sure. Just want to try venison in general.
  • jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
    edited November 2011
    I wanna make a phat juggalo feast for my juggalos and lettes. What should I cook and how do I do it? How much money will it be to buy the stuff and will I need a nife?

    GTFO ... No trollz 4110w3d
  • jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
    edited November 2011
    jugg wrote: »
    This will sound stupid but I have the biggest bitch of a time chopping an onion. Every time I do it the pieces are way to big. I have tried a few different ways but it never comes out worth a shit. Any tips or tricks would be great.

    i was going to write it out but i thought id just get a vid off youtube

    this is the best technique ... it'll take some practice to get good at it but its worth it ... just make sure your knife is VERY sharp or you'll make a mess of things

    ps the chick in the vid sounds hot
  • jehsiboijehsiboi Kanga Rump Ranga
    edited November 2011
    dude I'm serious. i just want an easy recipe for my freinds it doens't have to be about clowns or anything

    roast chicken with roast veg, mash potatoes, green peas ... all in the centre of the table so you are sharing the food, a great vibe comes from people sharing food .... thats all you get cause i think your a troll ...
  • SpinsterSpinster Regular
    edited November 2011
    jehsiboi wrote: »
    roast chicken with roast veg, mash potatoes, green peas ... all in the centre of the table so you are sharing the food, a great vibe comes from people sharing food .... thats all you get cause i think your a troll ...

    or go to the super market, buy a can or sache of something that goes along the lines of "just add sausages" or "Just add meat". them boil some spuds, mash them, and trow some peas on your plate too.
  • juggjugg Regular
    edited November 2011
    Man they make that shit look easy. Its not.
  • SpinsterSpinster Regular
    edited November 2011
    jugg wrote: »
    Man they make that shit look easy. Its not.

    well it is, its just that it takes time. I just learning to cook really but I'v learnt you just need to be patient and follow the recipes.
  • edited January 2012
    Asian sesame salad dressing. A good version has been defying me for a while now. I have tried sesame/hoi-sin based vinaigrette (hoi-sin is an awesome emulsifier, stuff never separates), I have tried running freshly toasted sesame seeds through a spice grinder and adding them to a basic rice vinaigrette, this was better. The problem is, all of them are definitely sesame, and definitely asian, but none of them really tasted great, passable, but not great. There is something acrid about both the rice vinegar and the sesame that then needs too much sweetness to balance out and I end up with a sugary sledgehammer, instead of a distinct but subtle dressing.

    C/O
    "Sez-you!"
  • imoscardotcomimoscardotcom Acolyte
    edited January 2012
    I've always wondered about the skin like bits between onion layers, and how I might remove them before or after slicing. I know they won't hurt me, but every time I see them my ocd side kicks in and I end up trying to remove every one I can find with my hands. :facepalm:
    Asian sesame salad dressing. There is something acrid about both the rice vinegar and the sesame that then needs too much sweetness to balance out and I end up with a sugary sledgehammer, instead of a distinct but subtle dressing.

    I know next to nothing about cooking (especially asian cooking), but perhaps a different kind of sugar would give a better/more authentic taste? Honey or palm/coconut sugar maybe? :confused: Assuming your using regular sugar to sweeten it now. Also ginger.

    Food, or ingredients anyway, for thought.
  • ShadyTrollShadyTroll Regular
    edited June 2012
    jehsiboi, come back! I miss you!
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