Power potential of electric motors? — Totseans

Power potential of electric motors?

fagfag Regular
edited December 2011 in Man Cave
Just curious. I stumbled across a bit that showed a 1kw DC motor can produce about 1hp and 28ft/lbs of torque. And if you overdrive the engine, it can produce up to 10 fold of that for a short period. Does that mean a mere 10kw motor can produce 2800ft/lbs and 100hp for a short burst? What does this translate to in real-world acceleration/cruising ability?

Comments

  • SpinsterSpinster Regular
    edited November 2011
    electric motor have lots of torque.

    torque is a twisting force, its what get you moving. and horse power is what keeps you moving (if that makes sense, I dont think it does) but ultimately HP is a calculation of torque and rpm.

    and isnt it 10Kw and 280ft/lbs?

    you will notice that the adverts for electric cars have quite a quick 0-100kmph time but only a top speed of like 130kmph

    hope that answers your question
  • TheWitchDoctorTheWitchDoctor Regular
    edited November 2011
    ^That's because the torque drops off really quick after a certain rpm and I'm pretty sure they only have one gear. I know the Nissan LEAF only has one gear, I'm not sure about other cars.
  • PsychlonicPsychlonic Regular
    edited November 2011
    I think it's just a matter of battery capacity at this point, really. When the day comes that a battery can withstand years of charging and each charge will get you quite far, it's going to be a good day. There's also the matter of cold weather performance, but if I recall this has already been hashed out to some degree.

    I envision a day when these become more common and we see people start modding them for extra performance. Capacitors on a switch that siphon battery power on command and then unleash huge jolts in rapid succession acting as "nitrous" that gets you going at a higher speed even faster. KERS used to directly translate into power instead of having to rely on its own boost system. Maybe someday the wind pressure produced can also be harnessed for extra energy.

    Traditionalists will complain that it's too complex but at the core level it's no more complex than anything else, it's just electronics instead of hoses and vacuum lines running a carbon fueled engine. Automakers will probably overcomplicate everything eventually though by having everything obscured by unnecessary bullshit making you have to take your car into a shop for maintenance unless you have the right diagnostic equipment. Which I will be getting if that day comes and I will slag as much fluff away as I can.
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited November 2011
    I think rather than improved batteries we will be looking at more advanced fuel cells.
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited November 2011
    ^I can see it now chippy, we develop fuel cells that use hydrogen extracted from water and in 500 years we will have a salt covered desert world LOL.
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited November 2011
    How about we do that for 250 years then switch to salt power

    [video=metacafe;412802/salt_power/]http://www.metacafe.com/watch/412802/salt_power/[/video]
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited November 2011
    Salt is the stuff of life.
  • dr rockerdr rocker Regular
    edited November 2011
    Spinster wrote: »
    electric motor have lots of torque.

    torque is a twisting force, its what get you moving. and horse power is what keeps you moving (if that makes sense, I dont think it does) but ultimately HP is a calculation of torque and rpm.

    and isnt it 10Kw and 280ft/lbs?

    you will notice that the adverts for electric cars have quite a quick 0-100kmph time but only a top speed of like 130kmph

    hope that answers your question

    One of the best ones I have seen as a description is Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall; torque is how far you will go through it.

    Their was talk of electic powered vehicles only having a forward and reverse gear - because electric motors have bags of low down torque and can rev very high, a conventional gearbox is not needed - you could get away without a reverse gear also simply by reversing the current entering the motor. What surprises me is that the technology has been pushed in cars first, rather than big trucks, tractors, heavy plant etc that would really benefit from a load of torque.
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited November 2011
    Electric trains and trams have been around for years taking advantage of high torque electric motors. Same with fairground rides. And for trains with no overhead power lines there is diesel electric.
  • dr rockerdr rocker Regular
    edited December 2011
    Thats true, but when you have something like a tractor unit for pulling an artic, you have a lot more space to play with for hiding batteries or a generator to run an electric motor than you would in a car. Even if an artic had a 'helper' motor for use in congestion, city areas, moving in goods yards, that would be a massive help. The diesel needed to get them moving is unbelievable.
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