Refried beans — Totseans

Refried beans

JackJack Regular
edited August 2011 in Life
Hi guys,

I refried some pinto beans and they're kind of bland. I tried adding salt and cumin (while frying them) but I'm not sure it helped much. It's okay since I'm pouring hot sauce on the burritos I'm making anyway, but I wonder if you have any advice there. I'm also looking for general suggestions of bean flavorings.

Also, I've made a decent mash of the beans but there are slightly tough bits that I don't get in canned refried beans, sort of like the 'skin' of the bean? I'm not sure if that's normal. Do I need to soak or fry them longer?

Thanks

Comments

  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited August 2011
    Jack wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I refried some pinto beans and they're kind of bland. I tried adding salt and cumin (while frying them) but I'm not sure it helped much. It's okay since I'm pouring hot sauce on the burritos I'm making anyway, but I wonder if you have any advice there. I'm also looking for general suggestions of bean flavorings.

    Also, I've made a decent mash of the beans but there are slightly tough bits that I don't get in canned refried beans, sort of like the 'skin' of the bean? I'm not sure if that's normal. Do I need to soak or fry them longer?

    Thanks

    Try a little fresh chopped cilantro.
  • BigHarryDickBigHarryDick Cock Bite
    edited August 2011
    chopped onion, cilantro, a little bit of bacon fat.

    fucking delicious
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited August 2011
    chopped onion, cilantro, a little bit of bacon fat.

    fucking delicious

    That actually sounds good with the bacon fat I am going to try that.
  • LouisCypherLouisCypher Regular
    edited August 2011
    Jack wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I refried some pinto beans and they're kind of bland. I tried adding salt and cumin (while frying them) but I'm not sure it helped much. It's okay since I'm pouring hot sauce on the burritos I'm making anyway, but I wonder if you have any advice there. I'm also looking for general suggestions of bean flavorings.

    Also, I've made a decent mash of the beans but there are slightly tough bits that I don't get in canned refried beans, sort of like the 'skin' of the bean? I'm not sure if that's normal. Do I need to soak or fry them longer?

    Thanks

    Cook them longer. Also BHD nailed it with the bacon fat, although traditionally they use lard.
  • JackJack Regular
    edited August 2011
    Thanks. It turns out I didn't cook them long enough. I cooked them with dried chopped onion in the pot, but that's obviously not ideal and I'm going to have fresh onion for the next batch. I'm a faggoty vegan so I'm not going for the bacon grease, but I know lard and the like gives it that unique taste that some people love. I have canola, peanut, and extra virgin olive oil. I'm not sure what's best but I've been using the canola oil. I'll have to get some cilantro too, not a bit of it in the house.
  • white88enochianwhite88enochian Regular
    edited August 2011
    i just get a can mix in shreded chease and garlic powder heat it up and eat it as a dip,

    sometimes i use sour cream
  • LouisCypherLouisCypher Regular
    edited August 2011
    Jack wrote: »
    Thanks. It turns out I didn't cook them long enough. I cooked them with dried chopped onion in the pot, but that's obviously not ideal and I'm going to have fresh onion for the next batch. I'm a faggoty vegan so I'm not going for the bacon grease, but I know lard and the like gives it that unique taste that some people love. I have canola, peanut, and extra virgin olive oil. I'm not sure what's best but I've been using the canola oil. I'll have to get some cilantro too, not a bit of it in the house.

    Shit man, if you are a vegan I highly suggest getting away from shit like "dried" anything. Use fresh, use local/organic whenever possible. I don't know how important good food is to you, but if I were going vegan I would even take some classes or try to get a job in a vegan restaurant. Good luck with your extremist diet.

    Also try out my corn soup recipe here: http://www.totse.info/bbs/showthread.php/18951-White-Corn-Soup.

    Just sautee your onion in oil instead of butter and you have a nice vegan soup.
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited August 2011
    I think everyone should be a vegan, more meat for me at lower prices.
  • BigHarryDickBigHarryDick Cock Bite
    edited August 2011
    ^^^ yeah that
  • LouisCypherLouisCypher Regular
    edited August 2011
    I hate any kind of bean. They're too mushy.

    How bout green beans or fava beans?
  • BigHarryDickBigHarryDick Cock Bite
    edited August 2011
    i think he meant kidney beans.

    all other beans are safe.
  • JackJack Regular
    edited August 2011
    Shit man, if you are a vegan I highly suggest getting away from shit like "dried" anything. Use fresh, use local/organic whenever possible. I don't know how important good food is to you, but if I were going vegan I would even take some classes or try to get a job in a vegan restaurant. Good luck with your extremist diet.

    Also try out my corn soup recipe here: http://www.totse.info/bbs/showthread.php/18951-White-Corn-Soup.

    Just sautee your onion in oil instead of butter and you have a nice vegan soup.

    Yeah man, I'm definitely trying that. I saw it earlier and it looks great. :thumbsup:

    I don't want to be a fatass junk food vegan, so I make sure to eat mostly healthy, whole foods and all that sort of thing. I like fresh produce but it's expensive sometimes and I'm bad at using it all before it spoils. I don't take classes but I do try a recipe I see every once in a while.
  • edited August 2011
    Jack wrote: »

    I don't want to be a fatass junk food vegan.

    Right on, I have met a ton of vegans that had shitty diets, coconut milk was the culprit in a lot of them, and a lack of variety.
    For refried beans, my latest kick is adding pickled garlic, and I like black beans because they don't look so nasty. As for the skins and chewy bits, soaking the beans before cooking will help, and a pressure cooker will do wonders if you want to use dried legumes a lot.
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